Nifty Notions: Part 2 – Heat Press Batting Together

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Click on images to get a better view.

Last month Nifty Notions reviewed this great product which has a multitude of uses for sewing (and for not sewing!). Part Two explains how to use this product for the Quilt-As-You-Go technique and for stabilising triangles for quilting blocks. If you missed Part One, you can catch it here.

QUILT-AS-YOU-GO

Do you shudder at the thought of rolling your sandwiched quilt into the comparatively smaller area of your sewing machine to quilt each block or the whole quilt? We all do! You need a large table surrounding your sewing machine to take the weight of your quilt and it is awkward to move the quilt in any direction to quilt. Machine companies have recognized this dilemma and their newer models have a wider free-arm area to accommodate this to some extent but it is still a difficult task. Many quilters now send their full quilt tops to a professional quilter who has a larger long arm quilting machine to easily quilt an overall quilt. If that quilt is made up of blocks, why not consider the technique of ‘quilt-as-you-go’?

 

What is ‘quilt-as-you-go’?

It is a quilting process of sewing together a block, batting and backing simultaneously.

As you make each block you may then layer the batting and backing underneath and quilt each block individually, holding all three layers together. Put these aside until all those blocks are quilted and then join them as a whole quilt using one of the many ‘quilt-as-you-go’ methods.

 

Let us explore two of the many methods quilters use with the help of HEAT PRESS Batting Together.

Method One Using Sashings:

 

Step 1. Cut the batting larger than the completed block by half the width of the desired finished sashing width. Eg. ½” larger on all four sides if the sashing is 1″ wide.

Cut the backing fabric larger again by another ¼” on all four sides.

 

Step 2. Layer all three with backing on the table with wrong side up, batting, block with right side up.

Step 3. Cut a 1 ½” strip of fabric for the sashing. Trim to length of one side of the block.

Using a ¼” seam, stitch one side of the sashing trim to one side of the block fabric only, pinning away the batting and backing fabric.

Fold the sashing up (as in Pic 3) then press downwards (as in Pic 4).

Pic 3 Fold the sashing up onto the block

Pic 4 Pressing the sashing downwards

 

 

Step 4. Using a ¼” seam, stitch the other side of the sashing trim to the appropriate side of the second block only, pinning away the batting and backing fabric.

Press so as blocks lay side by side and continue in this manner until a whole row of blocks are sewn with sashings.

Step 5. Turn to the back of the block and pin backing fabric away exposing the batting. Butt the batting edges together and fuse a strip of the Heat Press Batting Together ¾” Quilt As You Go over the join. Make sure to lightly glide the iron over the tape rather than applying pressing power so as not to flatten the quilt block.

 

Step 6. Press the backing fabric of one block over the batting join. Press under ¼” seam allowance on the other block’s backing fabric.

 

Step 7. Apply a thin line of Roxanne’s Glue Baste It (water soluble glue) to the underside of the pressed seam allowance. Place this backing side over the other backing side already covering the batting join. Lightly press into place to secure. It will hold the backing in place rather than pinning and worrying about removing pins as you sew. Note: Make sure you have the second backing side folded edge just overlapping the centre of the joined batting line.

Step 8. With the quilt block side facing up, stitch three evenly spaced rows of straight stitching on the sashing, making sure the centre one catches the glued edge of the backing underneath.

Alternatively, you may edge-stitch the folded edge from the backing side and then stitch another row either side of it.

 

Continue completing each block in the row and then complete other rows in the same manner. Join the rows together using the same technique resulting in a sashing surrounding each of four sides of all blocks. Bind the outer edges of the quilt.

 

A nice alternative for the sashing is to add a fine piping to either edge of the sashing.

Piping Hot Binding was used in our sample. For this version, the backing fabrics were stitched together and the seam pressed open. The blocks and batting are the same size, smaller than the backing. Butt them together and fuse from the right side using the Heat Press Batting Together ¾” Quilt As You Go. Place on top of the wrong side of the backing and quilt the sandwich through all three layers.

Place the piped sashing over the join and ditch stitch into place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Butt the blocks together and fuse from the right side

 

Place the piped sashing over the join and ditch stitch into place on the sashing alongside the piped trim.

The piping gives a neat finish to the sashing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Method Two – No Sashings:

Step 1. Make quilt blocks.

Step 2. Cut batting square ½” smaller than block size. Place batting on the wrong side of the quilt block, allowing ¼” of the block to extend past the edges of the batting.

 

Step 3. Cut the backing square ½” larger than the block size.

 

Step 4. Sandwich all three and quilt through all layers to within ¾” from the edges of the quilt block.

 

Step 5. Sew two blocks together along one side, right sides together, using a ¼” seam allowance, making sure only the block fabric is sewn. Press seam to one side.

 

Step 6. Lay two blocks, side by side, stitched together, with backing side up. Pin the two backing edges out towards the blocks, exposing the batting.

Butt the two edges of the batting together and fuse the Heat Press Batting Together ¾” Quilt As You Go tape over the join.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 7. Press the backing fabric of one block over the batting join. Press under ¼” seam allowance on the other block’s backing fabric.

 

 

 

 

 

Step 8. With the quilt block side facing up, stitch in the ditch through the seam where the blocks were joined together. Note: Make sure you have the second backing side folded edge extending past the block seam.

Continue joining all blocks in a row. Make other rows and then join the rows together using the same method.

You will now have a completed quilt with blocks joined together invisibly on both sides with no sashings.

To Stabilise Quilt Triangles:

Sometimes a fabric needs to be stabilised if used on the bias. Heat Press Batting Together is the ideal solution. You would not need to use this method each time you wish to cut Quarter Square and Half Square Triangles, but for those times that the fabric being used may need some support, then this is an ideal method. It may also be used for normal quilting fabric as an alternate method. It may suit some.

Using two different fabrics, cut two squares of desired size, one of each fabric.

With right sides together, stitch a ¼” seam allowance around all four sides.

For Half Square Triangles, fuse a piece of Heat Press Batting Together ¾” Quilt As You Go diagonally in both directions as per photo.

Using a rotary cutter and ruler, cut diagonally as shown.

Open and press with seam allowance to one side, not pressed open.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you are impressed how versatile this wonderful new product is and find the need to add it to your sewing & quilting supplies.

 

Products are available from good haberdashery retail outlets or from Punch with Judy, a regular exhibitor at the Craft & Quilt Fairs and Craft and Sewing Shows. Or visit www.punchwithjudy.com.au

 

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4 thoughts on “Nifty Notions: Part 2 – Heat Press Batting Together

    • Hi Helen,
      Glad to hear it! Had a customer today at the Craft & Quilt Fair in Hamilton NZ who manufactures (in a small way) knit clothing and she was very impressed too with my demonstration and is anxious now to use it for stabilizing her knit garment seams. Pleased to hear so many variations of its use. Keep those ideas coming please.

    • Hi Patricia, that’s exactly what I want to hear, purpose of mission done. Educating sewers how to use products. Well done. Let me know what you do and what you think of the product afterwards. Thanks, Judy

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